What is Certified Healthy Restaurant Program?

The Certified Healthy Restaurant program started in 2009 as an extension of the Certified Healthy Business program. The Certified Healthy Restaurant program recognizes single venues, local and national chain restaurants, and worksite venues that offer healthy options and tobacco free environments for their patrons and employees.

Why Does Certified Healthy Matter?

Becoming a Certified Healthy Restaurant means you are providing a healthy environment for your patrons and staff, as well as setting a standard of health for your community. By meeting most or all of the criteria to become Certified Healthy, Restaurants provide an established environment to foster healthy behaviors in the community and in the establishment. More people eat at restaurants more often than in previous years. In 2010, meals prepared outside of the home accounted for 35% of many children’s and adult’s total calorie intake. Additionally, many families are spending half their food budgets on foods prepared out of the home compared 1955 when only 25% of the food budget was spent on food prepared outside of the home (Change Lab Solutions, 2012). Ensuring healthy menu options and a healthy environment will contribute to healthier community and Oklahoma.

Becoming a Certified Healthy Restaurant means you are providing a healthy environment for your patrons and staff, as well as setting a standard of health for your community. By meeting most or all of the criteria to become Certified Healthy, Restaurants provide an established environment to foster healthy behaviors in the community and in the establishment. More people eat at restaurants more often than in previous years. In 2010, meals prepared outside of the home accounted for 35% of many children’s and adult’s total calorie intake. Additionally, many families are spending half their food budgets on foods prepared out of the home compared to 1955, when only 25% of the food budget was spent on food prepared outside of the home (Change Lab Solutions, 2012). Ensuring healthy menu options and a healthy environment will contribute to healthier community and Oklahoma.

  • Each year, 7 in 10 deaths among Americans are a result of chronic disease, and chronic diseases are, in a large majority of cases, preventable.3 (Data Source – Vital Statistics)
    • CDC estimates that up to 40% of the five leading causes of death (heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, and unintentional injuries) are preventable.2
    • As of 2009:
      • There were 31.4 deaths due to diabetes mellitus per 100,000 population in Oklahoma1.
      • There were 307.4 deaths due to cardiovascular disease per 100,000 population in Oklahoma1
    • Modifiable behaviors such as physical inactivity, tobacco use, and poor nutrition are largely responsible for the leading causes of death in the United States2
  • As of 2013, 23.7% of Oklahomans report they are current smokers1
    • Smoking-related healthcare expenditures for Oklahoma were $1.62 billion, and the cost of lost productivity due to smoking was $1.73 billion (2004 dollars).5
    • An American Productivity Audit found that tobacco use was a leading cause of lost production time — more than alcohol abuse or family emergencies.6
  • As of 2009, 35.4% of the Oklahoma population is overweight and 32.0% is obese (BRFSS Data from OK2Share).1
    • Individuals with high body mass index (BMI) levels (greater than X) cost an average of $2,326 (1996 dollars) more in annual health claims compared to individuals with healthy BMI levels.4
    • According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Americans consumed an average of 250 more calories per day in 2000 than in 1971.7
    • The Keystone Forum found that obesity is correlated with frequently eating foods prepared away from home(May 2006).7
    • Eating larger portion sizes, a US trend which began in the 1970s and became more common in the 1980s and 1990s, was also reported to be associated with higher obesity rates, according to the Forum.7

References

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS), (2012). Retrieved from: http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/ -OK2share

2 http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0501-preventable-deaths.html

3 http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/index.htm

4 Long, Adam D, Reed, Roger, Lehman, Gregg, “The Cost of Lifestyle Health Risks: Obesity”, Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, March 2006, 48:3, pages 244-251

5 Tobacco Free Kids (March 19, 2014). “Toll of Tobacco in the United States: The Toll of Tobacco in Oklahoma.” 2 pages. Available at http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/facts_issues/toll_us/Oklahoma. Accessed 6/09/2014.

6 Stewart WF, Ricci JA, Chee E, Morganstein D. Lost productive work time costs from health conditions in the United States: Results from the American Productivity Audit. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2003;45(12):1234–1246.

7 Take-Out Foods, Restaurant Meals Tied to Obesity Trends, http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=1&ContentID=2894