What is Certified Healthy Restaurant Program?

The Certified Healthy Restaurant program started in 2009 as an extension of the Certified Healthy Business program. The Certified Healthy Restaurant program recognizes single venues, local and national chain restaurants, and worksite venues that offer healthy options and tobacco free environments for their patrons and employees.

Why Does Certified Healthy Matter?

Becoming a Certified Healthy Restaurant means you are providing a healthy environment for your patrons and staff, as well as setting a standard of health for your community. By meeting most or all of the criteria to become Certified Healthy, Restaurants provide an established environment to foster healthy behaviors in the community and in the establishment. More people eat at restaurants more often than in previous years. In 2010, meals prepared outside of the home accounted for 35% of many children’s and adult’s total calorie intake. Additionally, many families are spending half their food budgets on foods prepared out of the home compared 1955 when only 25% of the food budget was spent on food prepared outside of the home (Change Lab Solutions, 2012). Ensuring healthy menu options and a healthy environment will contribute to healthier community and Oklahoma.

Becoming a Certified Healthy Restaurant means you are providing a healthy environment for your patrons and staff, as well as setting a standard of health for your community. By meeting most or all of the criteria to become Certified Healthy, Restaurants provide an established environment to foster healthy behaviors in the community and in the establishment. More people eat at restaurants more often than in previous years. In 2010, meals prepared outside of the home accounted for 35% of many children’s and adult’s total calorie intake. Additionally, many families are spending half their food budgets on foods prepared out of the home compared to 1955, when only 25% of the food budget was spent on food prepared outside of the home (Change Lab Solutions, 2012). Ensuring healthy menu options and a healthy environment will contribute to healthier community and Oklahoma.

In Oklahoma, two out of every three adults1 and one-third of adolescents2 are considered overweight and obese, and 1 in 5 adults are current smokers1. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, medical costs for both obesity and tobacco use are in the billions3, 4. It is estimated that obesity attributable expenditures in U.S, and Oklahoma are $147 billion and $1.72 billion respectively and the Surgeon General’s Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress reports states that direct medical costs for smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke is $130 billion4 (in Oklahoma, smoking related healthcare expenditures are around $1.62 billion5).


References

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS), (2012). Retrieved from: http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/ -OK2share

2 http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0501-preventable-deaths.html

3 http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/index.htm

4 Long, Adam D, Reed, Roger, Lehman, Gregg, “The Cost of Lifestyle Health Risks: Obesity”, Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, March 2006, 48:3, pages 244-251

5 Tobacco Free Kids (March 19, 2014). “Toll of Tobacco in the United States: The Toll of Tobacco in Oklahoma.” 2 pages. Available at http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/facts_issues/toll_us/Oklahoma. Accessed 6/09/2014.

6 Stewart WF, Ricci JA, Chee E, Morganstein D. Lost productive work time costs from health conditions in the United States: Results from the American Productivity Audit. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2003;45(12):1234–1246.

7 Take-Out Foods, Restaurant Meals Tied to Obesity Trends, http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=1&ContentID=2894

 

1 2016 Oklahoma Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.health.ok.gov/ok2share.

2 2017 Oklahoma Youth Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. http://www.health.ok.gov/ok2share.

3 Trogdon, J. G., Finkelstein, E. A., Feagan, C. W. and Cohen, J. W. (2012), State- and Payer-Specific Estimates of Annual Medical Expenditures Attributable to Obesity. Obesity, 20: 214–220. doi:10.1038/oby.2011.169

4 The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. (2014). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/50-years-of-progress/Fact-sheet.html. Retrieved June 2015.

5 Toll of Tobacco in Oklahoma. (updated June 20, 2018). Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids. http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/facts_issues/toll_us/oklahoma. Retrieved July 2018.